Science and Numeracy

Kar2ouche educational software provides a unique and fun way of developing students' knowledge of Numeracy and Science through exploration, discussion and visualisation.

Each title comes with a Teacher Support Pack, available in the downloads section of this site.

Maths and Problem Solving (KS 2)

Make problem solving fun.

Kar2ouche Maths and Problem Solving introduces students to mathematical concepts and skills in a relevant, interesting and fun context. It encourages them to apply their learning in real situations and demonstrate their understanding, as opposed to practising skills in a repetitive and disembodied way.

Ten activities are included that offer a range of problems based on money, distances, time, measurement and different scales. Starter storyboards establish the problems, to which students apply the necessary skills in order to find solutions. Students can then discuss the methods they have used with the rest of the group.

The first five activities are aimed at year 3 students; the remaining five at year 4:

  • At the Post Office – how much the birthday cards will cost
  • Earning Holiday Money – how much the children can earn
  • A Day Out – exploring units of measurement
  • Weights and Measures – reading different scales
  • Timetables – reading analogue clocks and constructing a timetable
  • Booking the Holiday – comparing the prices of flights
  • Holiday Shopping – practising mental maths problems
  • Sports Day – problems to do with length, perimeter and area
  • What's the Time? – how long things will take
  • Ready to Go? – packing a suitcase to stay within the weight allowance

Living Things & Healthy Lives (KS 2)

From dental care to diet, micro-organisms to movement and growth.

Kar2ouche Living Things and Healthy Lives allows students to develop their knowledge of Science through exploration, discussion and visualisation. Their work in the virtual world of Kar2ouche will complement both practical experiments and research in the classroom.

There are four suggested units that allow you to integrate class, group and pair discussions with a range of computer activities. This helps you to work with students as they develop their knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas and processes. In each unit there is a range of suggested activities closely linked to Key Stage 2 of the National Curriculum.

The units are comprised of:

  • Healthy Eating and Teeth – focusing on the need for a balanced and varied diet, the importance of dental care and the relationship between teeth and what we eat
  • Moving and Growing – looking at the functions of bones, how animals can be grouped according to their skeleton, and the life cycle of humans
  • Blood and Circulation, and Drugs – learning about the heart and circulatory system, and discovering the harmful effects of some drugs on the body.
  • Micro-organisms – finding out about the harmful and beneficial activities of micro-organisms.

Living Things in their Environments (KS 2)

Explore the world of plants and animals.

Kar2ouche Living Things In Their Environments helps students to develop their knowledge of the living world through the exploration, discussion and visualisation of the lives of plants and animals.

Using a wide range of characters, backgrounds, props, text and audio, students complete activities, such as re-ordering a pre-made storyboard to show their understanding of the process of pollination, or choosing the correct habitat for certain animals. Their work in the virtual world of Kar2ouche will complement both practical experiments and research in the classroom.

There are four units – two focus on plant biology, and two on the animal kingdom:

  • Plant Structures and the Growth and Nutrition of Plants – the conditions that plants need to grow and flourish; the functions of their main parts; the process of photosynthesis
  • Flowers and Plant Reproduction – the reproductive organs of flowers and the life cycle of plants, including seed dispersal and pollination
  • Classification, Local Habitats and Adaptation – how living things are grouped, the different habitats that organisms live in and how they have adapted to these environments
  • Feeding Relationships – food chains and ecosystems.

All the activities are mapped to the relevant Key Stage 2 National Curriculum references.

Elements & Atoms (KS 3,4)

Exploring the nature of matter.

Kar2ouche Elements and Atoms introduces students to a selection of scientists whose stories and ideas can be used to illustrate the development over time of man’s knowledge about the nature of matter.

Each historical character narrates a brief outline of his or her life story and then explains their scientific ideas and evidence for them. Students can use the different characters, text and backgrounds supplied to show their understanding of the ideas in a variety of storyboard activities, ranging from creating straightforward storyboards to describe a sequence of events, to constructing a museum exhibit or a television debate.

The scientific ideas covered start with ancient Greek theories and how they gained acceptance in the Islamic world, and then the work of alchemists and how they contributed to the development of the science of chemistry. The debate over the theory of phlogiston, Dalton's ideas about atoms, Mendeleev's development of the Periodic Table, and the discovery of the structure of the atom are also addressed.

Modern, fictional characters are also included to lead a debate, in which students are asked to consider the arguments for and against the use of radioactive materials in medicine.

Earth & the Environment (KS 3,4)

Understanding the Earth and our environment.

Kar2ouche Earth and the Environment covers two areas of scientific theory that have recently undergone rapid changes: our understanding of the Earth itself, and the most important environmental problems facing the world today.

The first set of activities looks at the development of geology as a science, in particular the work of Alfred Wegener and how his ideas were initially rejected. Leading scientists from the last 200 years are presented as 3D characters that present their theories. Modern characters then discuss the problem of predicting changes in the Earth’s crust, such as earthquakes and volcanoes.

The second set of activities looks at the many environmental issues that confront us: in particular, global warming and the depletion of the ozone layer. Each problem is considered from a historical point of view, and students are asked to suggest possible solutions.

The themes covered are:

  • Making rocks – how different types of rock are formed
  • Collecting evidence – how ideas about the age of the Earth have changed
  • Wegener’s big idea – the theory of continental drift
  • Cracked Earth – the theory of plate tectonics
  • Global warming – how the Earth’s temperature has changed over time
  • The hole in the ozone layer – what ozone is, CFCs and carbon dioxide emissions

Earth & the Universe (KS 3,4)

How and why we observe the skies.

Kar2ouche Earth and the Universe takes students through the history of man’s study of the Universe, from ancient times to the present day.

Leading astronomers over the ages, such as Aristotle, Ptolemy, Copernicus, Galilei and Hubble, are presented as 3D characters to explain their theories. Students can use the different characters, text and backgrounds supplied to show their understanding of the subject in a variety of storyboard activities.

The activities provide a variety of tasks to examine a wide spectrum of scientific theories, and range from creating straightforward storyboards to describe a sequence of events, to constructing a museum exhibit or a television debate.

The suggested activities cover:

  • how and why the skies were observed in ancient times
  • the different ideas people had to explain the movements of stars and
  • the development of the heliocentric solar system, and the reactions of
  • Newton's ideas on gravity
  • the development of optical and radio telescopes and photography
  • how satellites are used
  • arguments for and against spending on space technology
  • the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence
  • the discovery of other galaxies
  • pulsars and the expansion of the universe
  • ideas about the origins of the universe

Electricity & Forces (KS 3,4)

Discovering electricity and forces.

Kar2ouche Electricity and Forces provides an engaging way for students to develop their understanding of the unseen energies that affect us all.

The leading physicists from around the world and throughout history are presented as 3D characters that narrate a brief outline of their life story and explain their scientific ideas and the evidence for them.

Galvani and Volta argue about ‘animal electricity’, while Faraday investigates electricity and motion. Modern, fictional characters are also included to present arguments for different methods of generating electricity, with a debate about the pros and cons of using nuclear energy. Radioactivity is also covered in the context of the structure of the atom.

The way in which ideas about forces have changed over time is illustrated by the testimony of the ancient Greeks, such as Aristotle and Archimedes, and later renowned physicists, such as Newton and Galileo.

The suggested activities included will encourage students to show their understanding of these ideas by completing a series of tasks, ranging from creating straightforward storyboards to describe a sequence of events, to constructing a photostory or a newspaper article.

Health & Disease (KS 3,4)

Developing an insight into health and disease.

Kar2ouche Health and Disease covers a variety of topics based around the central theme of health and disease.

Students can investigate changing ideas about the heart and circulation, helped by scientists such as Aristotle, Galen and William Harvey. This topic is then extended into modern heart transplants and the problems faced by Christaan Barnard and his team. The factors behind heart disease and the ethics of using animals to provide organs for transplants can also be considered.

Also covered is the development of ideas about the spread of disease. This includes deficiency diseases, illustrated by the work of James Lind, the germ theory of disease, the discovery of penicillin, the development of vaccination and Edward Jenner's experiments. Students can also learn about modern medical issues such as the MMR vaccination debate, the link between smoking and lung cancer, and the spread of AIDS.

Students can use the different characters, text and backgrounds supplied to show their understanding of the subject in a variety of storyboard activities. The suggested activities provide a variety of tasks that range from creating straightforward storyboards to describe a sequence of events, to constructing a museum exhibit or a television debate.

Natural Selection & Genetics (KS 3,4)

Join Darwin on his voyage of discovery.

Kar2ouche Natural Selection and Genetics starts with Darwin's voyage on HMS Beagle, as he explains his ideas about natural selection, and follows the development of these ideas as they influence other scientists’ subsequent theories on evolution and inheritance.

It looks at the controversy caused by Darwin’s theory of evolution, and discusses alternative ideas about the origin of life. Mendel presents his work and the discovery of genes, while Crick and Watson explain the sequence of discoveries that led to our modern understanding of the structure of DNA.

Modern, fictional characters are used to present various arguments for and against the use of genetic engineering, cloning and gene therapy. They also represent current debates between creationists and supporters of the theory of evolution, and students are encouraged to use the information provided to formulate their own views on these topics. They can present their ideas by using the characters and backgrounds provided in the storyboard activities, which range from straightforward storyboards to describe a sequence of events, to constructing an encyclopaedia entry or a television interview.